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Holiday Open year-round
Business hours 9:00~17:00
Workshop info

● The warm simplicity of Raku ware pottery
Rakunyu-gama is a kiln mastering the traditional techniques of Raku-yaki, highly prized pottery used in Japanese tea ceremonies. Its activities are centered around the production of matcha tea bowls, as well as various flower vases, incense containers and plates. As Raku ware is moulded by hand without the use of a potter’s wheel, its charm lies in a warm and rustic appearance. Developed as a part of Kyoto culture, its technique and texture differ from those of the typical Kyoto ware. Along with the creation of Raku-yaki, characterized by low-temperature firing, Rakunyu-gama is also striving to create light-colored ceramics.

Holiday Irregular holidays
Business hours 9:00~17:00
Workshop info

● Traditional bamboo craft in modern Japanese lifestyle
Japanese art of bamboo weaving and plaiting takes full advantage of the strength and flexibility of bamboo strips to produce high-quality baskets. Meet the artisan who went further and challenged himself to create elegant bags using the traditional basket-making technique. The various processes involved in the creation of a hand-woven bag, such as bamboo splitting, weaving, lacquer applying and sewing, are all done by one person with a scrupulous attention to detail. It is said that it takes 3 years to learn how to split bamboo properly: mastering the Japanese weaving and plaiting techniques requires long-time training and effort. 8 basic ways of bamboo weaving unfold into infinite variations of shapes and patterns.

Holiday Sundays
Business hours 9:00~18:30
Workshop info

● Unparalleled craftsmanship of Kyoto lacquerware
Founded more than 100 years ago, the studio mainly produces incense tools and tea ceremony related lacquerware products. Though initially the woodworking was at the core of studio’s activities, now they also include all the processes of lacquerware production, from wooden base manufacturing to the maki-e, raden or relief carving decoration. All the operations are carried out by the division of labour, and the studio boasts to be one of the rare places in Kyoto to complete order-made lacquerware items from scratch, starting from lathe woodturning.

Holiday Open year-round
Business hours 9:00~17:00
Workshop info

● Uniqueness of subtle green glaze
UNRAKU-gama kiln holds a special place in the rich Kyo-yaki / Kiyomizu-yaki pottery tradition. Kyoto-style earthenware produced here is well-known for its original traditional patterns depicting the beauty of nature, meticulously painted over smooth surface. Slightly greenish aomatto glaze has become the most representative feature of UNRAKU-gama production. Skillful potter pays attention to the conditions of firing, which may eventually bring out the whiteness or crystallization of the glaze. This innovative kiln was the first in the national ceramics industry to introduce the practice of firing in an electric kiln, making a huge contribution to the world of Japanese pottery tradition.

Holiday Sundays, public holidays & irregular closings on Saturdays
Business hours 10:00~18:00
Workshop info

● Kyoto round fans, elegant touch of freshness
Kyoto round fans, called Kyo-uchiwa or miyako-uchiwa, enjoy great popularity for their fine and elegant appearance. With sophisticated designs incorporating different craft techniques like openwork or woodblock printing to enhance decorative elements, Kyo-uchiwa tends to add a fresh touch of colour to any interior. The ribs and handles of Kyoto round fans are made separately in a style called sashie : about 100 bamboo ribs are arranged radially by hand, and the handle is attached at the end of the process. Every year, Shiomi Dansen carries out the production of more than 200 varieties of fans with traditional designs and handles of all kinds.

Holiday Mondays & Tuesdays
Business hours 11:30~18:00
Workshop info

● The last standing spinning top maker
In Momoyama period (1568-1600), imperial court ladies used to wind bright-colored kimono fabric strips around a bamboo rod to make a “tatami room spinning top”, the ancestor of modern Kyo-koma, or Kyoto spinning top. The craft of spinning top making has long flourished, but now Jakkyu remains the only place in Kyoto to carry on this unique tradition. No edged tools are involved in Kyo-koma shaping process: flat cotton strips dyed in vivid colors are rolled around a bamboo rod using only fingers. Even today, elegant Kyoto spinning tops are popular for their beautiful smooth rotation.

Holiday Sundays
Business hours 9:00~18:00
Workshop info

● Unique tradition of Kyoto lantern making
Founded about 220 years ago, Kobishiya Chūbe has long illuminated temples, shrines, shops and restaurants. Now the traditional technique of lantern making called jibari-shiki is carried on by two brothers, Shun and Ryo Kojima.
The manufacturing method consists of creating a lantern frame by bending bamboo strips into individual rings and fixing them together with hemp strings, which results in the production of tough lanterns easy to repair. As a fair amount of time and effort is put into each lantern, this method has become rare nowadays, but Kobishiya Chūbe continues to provide temples, shrines and long-established shops with high-quality lanterns.

Holiday Bon period & New year holidays
Business hours 10:00~17:00
Workshop info

● Kyoto braided cords: indispensable supporting actors of Japanese culture
Kyo-kumihimo, or Kyoto braided cords, combine both ornamental and practical use and are widely used in kimono clothing, tea utensils, Buddhist ritual implements and other elements of Japanese culture. During the long history of this craft, as many as 3,500 ways of braiding were developed for a broad range of applications. Yarn dyeing, braiding, knotting and other production processes are usually completed by division of labour, but Showen Kumihimo is one of the rare braided cord makers to deal with all these operations. Along with mastering traditional handmade techniques, the studio has also the ability to mass-produce high-quality kumihimo on a braiding machine in order to respond to the increasing demand from fashion and interior design industries.

Holiday Saturdays and Sundays
Business hours 9:00~17:00
Workshop info

● Solemn splendor of gold
Gold leaf stamping technique, originally used for decoration of various religious furnishings, fittings and statues in Buddhist temples, consists of gluing gold leaves to the plane or three-dimensional surface with the help of urushi lacquer. Kyoto gold leaf stamping is characterized by a luxurious rich gloss created by the meticulous handwork of high-skilled artisans. Studio’s master craftsman Norifumi Fujisawa is actively engaged not only in Buddhist fittings decoration, but also in numerous fashion and interior design collaborations.

Holiday Saturdays, Sundays and public holidays (inquire in advance)
Business hours 9:00~17:00
Workshop info

●The beauty of Nishiki created through orchestrated effort of numerous craftsmen
Since ancient times, Nishiki-ori, Kyoto silk brocades woven with gold, silver and multi-colored threads, have been valued for their luxurious appearance. KOHO Nishiki Textile Studio undertakes the restoration of precious ancient textiles and conducts a thorough research about the traditional weaving techniques, from the silk cocoons processing to the tools and weaving equipment. Nishiki textiles are created through the combined skills of numerous craftsmen, involving not less than 70 various processes. The works of the textile artist Koho Tatsumura are characterized by a stunning luminous three-dimensional effect and are called “The Weaving of Light” overseas.

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