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Holiday Wednesday
Business hours 10:00~17:00
Workshop info

● The narrowest woven fabric in the world favoured by samurai
Very durable and resistant to stretching, sanadahimo cords came into use during Warring States period (1467-1568) serving as straps for swords and armour. As sanadahimo cord is woven on a loom, it is called “the narrowest woven fabric in the world”. With the development of the way of tea, these cords with their infinite possibilities of design were perfect for tying wooden boxes for tea utensils. For 15 generations, Enami has been transmitting precious techniques of sanadahimo (such as yakusokuhimo, or “promise bonds”, for different tea ceremony schools) and carrying out all the processes of the traditional cord making, from yarn dyeing to weaving.

Holiday Sundays
Business hours 8:00~17:00
Workshop info

● Kyoto mounting works combining beauty and utility
The role of a hanging scroll is beautiful presentation and safe long-term conservation of a piece of artwork on paper. Gaining rich experience as master mounter working for Urasenke tea ceremony school, Seikodo Nakajima takes advantage of peculiarities of materials such as washi paper and kire (cut pieces of textile) to deal with all kinds of mountings that combine beauty and utility (hanging scrolls, fusuma and shoji sliding door panels, folding screens, etc.). In Kyoto, the craft of mounting has developed along with fine arts and tea ceremony. Kyoto mountings that match calligraphy and paintings with multi-coloured kire of Nishijin textiles are especially held in high esteem.

Holiday Saturdays, Sundays & public holidays
Business hours 9:00~17:00
Workshop info

● Maker of delicately handcrafted Buddhist paraphernalia
The golden glitter of Kyoto crafts is created in skillful hands of local artisans specialising in stamping of 0.0001 mm-thick gold leaves. Gold leaf stamping technique was originally used for decoration of various Buddhism-related crafts. Even today, it plays a great role in Japanese traditional culture. TADA Kinpaku is an atelier dealing with Buddhist statues and implements. In Kyoto, the elaborate techniques of gold stamping have developed due to the high demand provided by the sheer amount of temples and head temples of many Buddhist sects. Today, gold leaf decoration can be applied to different materials and shapes, bringing Kyoto craftsmanship to the new level.

Holiday Sundays
Business hours 10:00~18:00
Workshop info

● Still flourishing phantom dyeing technique

Tsujigahana was in fashion in Azuchi-Momoyama period (1558-1600), when it was a term designating a gorgeous kimono. Nowadays, it’s called a “phantom dyeing technique” because of its very little documented origins. ESHIBORIAN is an atelier where Fukumura Hirotoshi and his son Takeshi are reviving tsujigahana dyeing techniques. Shibori-zome, or tie-dyeing performed by sewing, binding and clamping fabric before immersing it into dye liquor, is complemented by other decorative techniques, such as hand painting, to create picturesque bright-coloured patterns. This precious traditional craft is maintained in the northern part of Kyoto blessed with high-quality underground water.

Holiday Sundays & public holidays
Business hours 10:00~17:00
Workshop info

● The supervisor of fine yuzen kimono making

Kyo-tegaki-yuzen dyeing is produced by thoroughly fragmented division of labour and involves up to 15 various processes. Tomihiro Senko is mastering all these sophisticated processes to create high-quality order-made products. The atelier is excelling in a special technique which consists of using a paintbrush instead of a writing brush for the deepest penetration of dyes into the fabric. Tomihiro Senko is an experienced supervisor of all the kimono-making processes and provides fine goods for the Imperial household. Familiar with the traditional patterns and designs, the atelier is also known for the production of elegant miscellaneous Japanese-style textile goods.

Holiday Sundays & public holidays
Business hours 9:00~19:00
Workshop info

● Well-established shop with a scent of tradition
Hayashi Ryushodo incense shop was established in 1834. It offers a great choice of various aroma goods : fragrant wood, shoko (chipped incense), incense sticks and scent bags. The shop is well known for mastering delicate techniques of chopping carefully selected pieces of aloeswood, agarwood and sandalwood, as well as for its original way of aroma blending. Hayashi Ryushodo counts numerous Buddhist temples and specialists in incense and tea ceremonies among its loyal customers. Subtle scent of incense enhances living space, and can be enjoyed by five senses. Hayashi Ryushodo devotes its skills to passing down the traditional art of japanese incense in all its variations of shape, colour and form of smoke.

Holiday Sundays & public holidays
Business hours 9:00~18:00
Workshop info

● The oldest traditional sake brewery in central Kyoto
Established about 280 years ago, this oldest and full of history sake maker in central Kyoto continues to protect the tradition of sake brewing. Close to Kamogawa river and surrounded by mountains, the brewery is located in a rich natural environment highly favorable to the creation of numerous aromatic brands of sake. Kyoto underground water and locally grown rice are used as ingredients for brewing premium sake best suited for exquisite Kyoto cuisine. While preserving traditional techniques, the brewery progressively introduces modern technology, such as use of solar panels or temperature control equipment.

Holiday Mondays,Sundays,Public holidays, New Year's holidays, Obon holidays
Business hours 10:00~17:30
Workshop info

●Karakami paper that adorns Shinto shrines, Buddist temples and tearooms

Simply put, Kyo-karakami is a type of woodblock print which uses printing blocks hand-carved on magnolia wood with traditional patterns passed down from ancient times. It is produced by a traditional method where coloring materials called kira (mica) and gofun (white pigment) are added to its surface, and the design is copied with the palm of the hand by overlaying it onto washi paper or torinoko (lustrous and smooth paper) one sheet at a time. To this day, Maruni continues to use printing blocks from the Tempo Era (1830-1844) and protects the patterns, coloring materials, tools, and traditions of old.

Holiday Mondays,Wednesdays,Thursdays,Sundays and pubic holidays
Business hours 14:00~16:00
Workshop info

● Experience Kyoto culture through Kyo-kumihimo braided cords
Developed in Nara period (710-794), Kyo-kumihimo braiding technique bloomed in ancient Kyoto, decorating Shinto and Buddhist implements, armor, kimono accessories and furnishings. Kumihimo cords with multi-coloured patterns are made using various braiding stands, such as marudai, kakudai, takadai or ayatakedai. At Meikyoan, cord braiding workshops with real tools and materials are implemented under the guidance of traditional craftsman Meijun Naruhashi. After the workshop, enjoy matcha tea in a tea ceremony room, listening to the explanations about Kyoto culture.

Holiday Irregular holidays
Business hours 9:00~18:00
Workshop info

● Elegant patterns created with tie-dyeing technique

Established in the precincts of Kandaijin shrine in 1932, Atelier Morimoto is specializing in tie-dyeing. Through the division of labour, the atelier is consistently carrying out all the stages of dyeing process, from designing patterns to colouring. Dyeing is performed with the technique that consists of tying the parts of the cloth which are not to be coloured before dyeing it in different colours (resist dyeing). The atelier is famous for its high-quality dyed goods such as wedding futons decorated with flower and landscape patterns, which require mastering Kyo-kanoko-shibori technique representing the essence of Kyoto tie-dyeing tradition.