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Holiday Irregular holidays
Business hours 10:00~17:00
Workshop info

● Nishijin Tsuzure-ori: delicate painting-like brocade weaving
Have you ever heard of Kyoto nail-scratching tapestry weaving technique? Artisan sharpens his fingernails into a saw-tooth shape and uses them like a comb to create a relief brocade pattern. This technique is very advanced and time consuming — even the most skillful and experienced craftsman spends the whole day to weave only a few centimeters of textile. Don’t miss the unique opportunity to learn from the master craftsman Kikuo Hirano about Tsuzure-ori weaving and get some insights into the art of color arrangement.

Holiday Sundays & public holidays; also every 2nd & 4th Saturday from January to September
Business hours 9:00~17:30
Workshop info

● Delicate handmade candlelight
In Kyoto, where the headquarters of all the Buddhist sects are located, handmade warosoku (Japanese candle) production is a highly valued traditional craft. Due to the vegetal origin of materials (warosoku are made from haze tree wax, washi paper and vegetal fibres), they don’t release oily smoke or soot while burning. Nakamura Rosoku, Japanese candle maker since 1887, is still following the traditional method of shaping candles one by one with the help of a wooden mould and applying the last coat of melted wax by hands. Warosoku made by this technique are appreciated for their bright shimmering flame.

Holiday Saturdays, Sundays & New Year's holiday
Business hours 10:00~17:00
Workshop info

● The ultimate protector of Kyoto-style umbrella tradition
Established more than 100 years ago, Hiyoshiya is actually the only producer of Kyo-wagasa, traditional Kyoto-style umbrella, which plays an important role in various cultural events such as outdoor tea ceremonies, Noh and Kabuki stage performances, as well as solid and rustic umbrella for general use. Kyo-wagasa, made from carefully selected bamboo and washi (Japanese paper), is held in high esteem in Japan and overseas. Recently, Hiyoshiya has also been actively designing and producing new lifestyle products, such as lighting equipment, using traditional umbrella-making methods and techniques.

Holiday Sundays & public holidays (inquire in advance)
Business hours 9:00~17:00
Workshop info

● The appeal of bright-coloured Cochin ware
In Hiyoshi, Kyoto area famous for the distinguished ceramics production, Koshun-gama has been producing impressive vibrant-coloured Cochin ware for three generations. A wide variety of items—everything from tea utensils to casual tableware—is created here using icchin, or tube lining decorating technique. The edges of patterns are defined with the relief lines made by squeezing soft clay through a nozzle. After applying a colored glaze, the low-temperature firing takes place, bringing out the distinctive Cochin ware colours. All the processes are performed by the same artisan, who is willing to create new order-made items.

Holiday Saturdays, Sundays & public holidays
Business hours 9:00~18:00
Workshop info

● The inherited techniques of Kyoto-style pottery
Shunzan-gama is a third-generation pottery maker located in Sennyu-ji temple area which has long been abundant in kilns. The studio has inherited the distinguishing style of Ogata Kenzan (1663-1743), a potter active in the middle of the Edo period. The works of Shunzan-gama are well known for their characteristic flower designs completely covering the surface which still preserves the tenderness of soft clay. The studio creates the earthenware adapted to the modern lifestyle, mastering the colorful painting and openwork carving techniques of Kyoto-style pottery cultivated through its 100-year-old history.

Holiday Saturdays, Sundays & public holidays (※Open every 1st Saturday)
Business hours 9:00~18:00
Workshop info

● Passing down the Kyoto rosary-making tradition
Nakano Isuke has been producing and selling Kyo-nenju, or Kyoto-style rosaries, for the last 250 years. The large part of Japanese rosaries are produced in Kyoto, and Nakano Isuke boasts to be the leader of this industry, providing temples with rosaries which are made according to the traditional production methods defined by each Buddhist sect.
The basic 108 beads, made of linden wood or natural stone, represent each a human worldly desire. By connecting the rosary beads with fine-quality silk threads, this long-established atelier remains the unique place to faithfully pass the techniques of Kyoto rosary craft down through history.

Holiday Sundays & public holidays
Business hours 9:00~17:00
Workshop info

● Sacred purity of unfinished wood
The studio is specializing in woodworking, producing furnishings and votive objects for Shinto shrines and religious ceremonies. Ceremonial implements are generally made of unfinished wood without any lacquer coating. Beautiful white-grained hinoki (Japanese cypress) wood is believed to represent the concept of purity so important in Shinto religion. Sometimes artisan even purifies himself and puts on white clothing before starting to work. The impressive array of assembled woodwork planes can tell you a remarkable story of Kyoto traditional wood joint-making and bending techniques.

Holiday Sundays & public holidays
Business hours 10:00~18:00
Workshop info

● Kyoto dolls’ private hair stylist
The art of traditional doll making—hina dolls, gogatsu dolls, or other—was nurtured and passed down through the centuries of Kyoto elegant culture. Kyo-ningyo, or Kyoto dolls, are made by numerous artisans who fabricate special components such as heads, hands and feet, accessories and clothing. Kimata is specializing in attaching hair to the dolls’ heads, the task that is executed with extreme preciseness and delicacy. The repair and restoration of old dolls of all the Japanese regions and periods are carefully performed here as well.

Holiday Every 2nd Saturday, Sundays & public holidays
Business hours 9:00~18:00
Workshop info

● Rich glow of gold brocade
At Orisho Hirai, silk threads are intertwined with gold threads and woven into splendid gold brocade priest robes. According to the Nishijin weaving tradition, the umebata loom is installed below ground level to create the perfect condition for weaving—humidity softens the silk threads, making them easier to deal with. Kyoto traditional technique called hikibaku consists of affixing gold leaves on a sheet of washi paper with lacquer, cutting it into extremely thin filaments (about 0.3 mm) and weaving the obtained gold threads into the silk fabric for the luxurious three-dimensional effect.

Holiday Sundays & public holidays
Business hours 9:00~17:00
Workshop info

● The beauty of finely traced family crests
Kamon, or Japanese family crest, is an indispensable part of any formal-style kimono, starting from those that are created using Kyo-kuromontsuki-zome dyeing method. By combining 4,000 existing crest patterns, up to one hundred million variations of crests can be created. With the use of a writing brush, Chinese ink and a compass made of bamboo, skillful artisans of Kamon no Koga delicately trace small (only 3 cm in diameter) family crests. They carry on the techniques of a traditional craft that is undeniably the highlight of Kyoto textile dye craftsmanship.